Keeping Things Transparent

A quick update on our plans for 2020 Majors:

Some of the feedback we’ve received in response to our blog post “Keeping Things Competitive” from teams and tournament organizers is that the business of leagues (specifically, shared ownership of leagues between TOs and teams) does not create new conflicts of interest, because similar arrangements have existed in the past and those conflicts of interest are not significant.

While we can point to clear cases where relationships between teams and TOs have generated distrust in the community, we agree that our near-term priority should be collecting more data and requiring more transparency so that conflicts of interest can be properly evaluated.

Therefore, for 2020, teams and players registering for the Majors will be required to publicly disclose their business relationships with other participants and/or the tournament organizer, so that public conversations can be had about the value that leagues and other entanglements offer versus the risk that they pose. Failure to disclose any business with the TO or other participants will likely result in disqualification.

We do not intend to add any other requirements for participation in (or hosting of) 2020 Major Championships.

Key Change

Starting today, CS:GO container keys purchased in-game can no longer leave the purchasing account. That is, they cannot be sold on the Steam Community Market or traded. Pre-existing CS:GO container keys are unaffected–those keys can still be sold on the Steam Community Market and traded.

Why make this change? In the past, most key trades we observed were between legitimate customers. However, worldwide fraud networks have recently shifted to using CS:GO keys to liquidate their gains. At this point, nearly all key purchases that end up being traded or sold on the marketplace are believed to be fraud-sourced. As a result we have decided that newly purchased keys will not be tradeable or marketable.

For the vast majority of CS:GO users who buy keys to open containers, nothing changes; keys can still be purchased to open containers in their inventory. They simply can no longer be traded or transacted on the Steam Community Market.

Unfortunately this change will impact some legitimate users, but combating fraud is something we continue to prioritize across Steam and our products.

If you have feedback or concerns about this change feel free to email us at CSGOTeamFeedback [at] valvesoftware.com with the subject “Key Restriction”.

Cache và Phát hành

Cache đã được cập nhật bởi FMPONE và Volcano và có thể chơi trên các máy chủ chính thức trong các chế độ Đơn giản, Tử chiến, và Đụng độ.

Hòm Vũ khí và Vỏ nhộng hình dán CS20

Hôm nay chúng tôi phát hành Hòm CS20 để đánh dấu kỷ niệm thứ hai mươi của Counter-Strike. Hòm vũ khí này chứa một loạt các sơn phủ vũ khí theo chủ đề từ Workshop Cộng đồng Steam và chứa Classic Knife như vật phẩm hiếm, một vật phẩm kinh điểm của loại trò chơi Counter-Strike. Cũng có sẵn hôm nay làVỏ nhộng hình dán CS20, bao gồm 20 hình dán thiết kế bởi cộng đồng.

Keeping Things Competitive

We’re back from the incredible StarLadder Berlin Major. While the teams were busy with record-breaking 60-round matches, the community was busy as well: tournament items for this major will pay out over $11 million for participating teams and players!

During the Major, we followed conversations in the community about leagues, media rights, and the future of CS:GO events. And while we typically don’t weigh in on these conversations, there are a few issues we want to clarify to make sure everyone is on the same page.

Leagues

We make it free to get a license to operate a CSGO tournament because we want to get out of the way of third parties creating value for our customers. Often that value comes from experimentation–tournament operators experiment with presentation, technology, formats, locations, etc. We support experiments that are scoped large enough to identify new and interesting opportunities, but not so large that if they fail it would be hard for the ecosystem to recover. With that in mind, CS:GO leagues present two concerns for us:

Exclusivity

Recently there have been steps toward a broad form of exclusivity where teams who compete in a particular event are restricted from attending another operator’s events. This form of team exclusivity is an experiment that could cause long-term damage. In addition to preventing other operators from competing, exclusivity prevents other events from keeping the CSGO ecosystem functioning if an individual event fails. At this time we are not interested in providing licenses for events that restrict participating teams from attending other events.

Shared Ownership

A few years ago, we started talking to tournament operators, teams, and players about the importance of avoiding conflicts of interest in CS:GO Majors. We consider a conflict of interest to be any case where a tournament, team, or player has a financial relationship with any other participating team or its players. This includes multi-team ownership, leagues with shared ownership by multiple teams, or essentially any financial reason to prefer that one team win over another. In open events, like the Majors, teams with these business arrangements may have (real or percieved) financial interest in the success of teams that they are competing with. In order to participate in Majors, we require that players, teams, and tournament operators confirm that they have no existing conflicts of interest, or if they do, disclose them and work to resolve them. This requirement isn’t new, but we felt it was worth reiterating given the conversations we’re hearing. If you are interested, the exact terms we require are below.

Media Rights

Another conversation we saw during the Major was about the ability for members of the community to broadcast the Major. Throughout the year, tournament operators use their events to build relationships with sponsors and media partners. When it’s time for the Majors, we think it’s important that they don’t disrupt those existing relationships. For this reason, the Major tournament operator has always been the only party that has had a license to broadcast the Major.

However, we do expect our Major partners to be as inclusive as possible. Major tournament operators are expected to work with streamers in order to provide viewers with access to valuable alternative content and underserved languages, whether through official streams or otherwise. Anyone that wants to offer a unique perspective and co-stream the Major should reach out to the Major tournament operator ahead of time in order to ensure a good experience for everyone involved.

More Detail on Conflict of Interest

Here are the terms we’ve required that players and teams accept when they register for a Major:

Teams and players should not have any financial interest in the success of any team that they are competing against. To participate in this Tournament, players and teams are required to affirm that they have no business entanglement (including, but not limited to, shared management, shared ownership of entities, licensing, and loans) with any other participating team or its players. If you have an agreement or business arrangement that you think may be of concern, then please reach out to the CS:GO development team for further discussion.

“I am not currently aware of any conflict of interest that I might have with another participating team or any player on another participating team. If I currently have a conflict of interest, or become aware of one over the course of the event, I will immediately provide detail to the CS:GO development team explaining the nature of my relationship with the other player or players, and a plan for resolving the issue in the future. I understand that failure to report my conflict of interest may result in my disqualification from the event and/or forfeiture of proceeds.”

In addition to players, the tournament operator accepts the following clause in the Major tournament agreement:

Licensee and Tournament event staff may not have any business entanglement (including, but not limited to, shared management, shared ownership of entities, licensing, and loans) with any participating team or players. If Licensee has any business entanglement with any player or teams then Licensee will disclose them in writing (including a description of the nature of the conflict) to Valve as of the Effective Date and at any point thereafter during the Term when such entanglement may arise. Within its sole discretion, Valve reserves the right to a) require that Licensee address and remove the business entanglement or b) terminate the Agreement without cost or penalty.

We think that avoiding conflict of interest is an important part of ensuring fair and honest competition, and so we do not have any plans to change these requirements for participation in a Major.

Tân vương StarLadder Berlin Major


Xin chúc mừng Astralis đã lập kỷ lục ba lần liên tiếp vô địch Major, nâng tổng số lần chiến thắng lên con số bốn.

Con đường đến trận chung kết của AVANGAR đã gặp phải kẻ khổng lồ Astralis, đội đã chiếm lĩnh quyền kiểm soát loạt trận ngay từ vài ván đầu và giữ vững lợi thế.

Xin cảm ơn tất cả khán giả đã theo dõi giải Major, nhà tổ chức StarLadder, các đội tuyển và tuyển thủ vì sự kiện tuyệt vời này.

Và đừng quên, bạn vẫn còn cơ hội ủng hộ cho đội tuyển mình yêu thích đấy–các vật phẩm tuyển thủ và đội hiện được giảm giá tới 75%!